What does the Library do with my reading list? What does the Library do with my reading list?

When you publish (or republish) your reading list, the Library receives a notification and begins a review of your list.  This involves us checking the books and chapters on your reading list against our existing stock, and purchasing new titles or additional copies of items we already have in stock where needed.  The number of copies of each item we buy is decided by the importance category (Core or Further Reading) assigned to the item, along with a number of other factors decided on a school by school basis in partnership with your Academic Librarian

In addition, in line with the Library’s Digital First policy, we will purchase an ebook version of any Core or Further Reading books where available to make your resources accessible to as many students as possible.

When we complete the review of your reading list, you will receive a notification of completion, along with any additional actions that might be required or details of any resources we were unable to acquire for you.

Please note that the Library only checks books, chapters, and DVDs during the review process.  We do not check documents, journal articles, websites, or other online content during the review process.

What about item types the Library doesn’t check? What about item types the Library doesn’t check?

The Library only checks books, chapters, and DVDs during a reading list review.  If you’ve got any questions about how to best add non-book items to your reading list, or if find any broken links on your reading list, please get in touch with the Reading Lists team at Lib.Reading@uea.ac.uk who will be happy to advise you.  


If you have any questions about accessing our electronic journals or ebooks, please contact our Electronic Services team at eservices@uea.ac.uk.

Why are Importance categories important? Why are Importance categories important?

Giving items on your reading list Importance categories (Core Reading and Further Reading) helps both your students and the Library.  For your students, it gives a clear indication of the weighting given to each reading, and helps them to prioritise their studies.  The Library uses these importance categories to inform how many copies of each of the items on your reading list we need to buy to meet likely student demand.

This table gives an indication of when to use each Importance category, and how this information is used by the Library. 

Category When to use it How the library uses it to select material
Core

To denote reading that is required in order for the student to progress in their studies.

Typically used to denote 1-3 items a week or per subject area.

Will always select an unlimited access ebook license if available.

If no such license is available, the library typically purchases one print book or user license for every 5-15 students on course, depending on subject area.

Receives priority in terms of staff time and funds.

Further

To denote reading that will help students progress well in their studies, and provide additional context to core reading.

Will select unlimited access ebook licenses only if cost allows, otherwise purchase individual (one at a time) licenses.

If no adequate license exists, the library will typically purchases one print book for every 10-50 students on a course, depending on subject area.

Second in priority in terms of staff time and funds

Recommended for Student Purchase To denote reading where students are expected to purchase their own copy of the item. Will look for digital equivalents where available but will not usually order large amounts of print unless specifically requested to do so.
No category Used for anything else, for example wider reading in the subject area and general bibliographies. The Library will treat this as Further Reading unless informed otherwise by the owning academic.
Non Talis reading list or embedded text in Talis Used for anything else, for example wider reading in the subject area and general bibliographies. The library will not ‘stock check’ against lists in these formats

Relevant Library policies Relevant Library policies

All ordering based on Talis is underpinned by the Library’s Collection Development Policy. The two most relevant sections are included below:

Digital First

  • Where available electronically, the Library adopts a digital first policy for buying books to support undergraduate teaching. Physical versions are generally only purchased if the e-book edition is out of date or its license terms insufficient to meet the needs for concurrent student access.

Book buying

  • Core reading lists items and books for undergraduate teaching are prioritized, with selective purchase of research books based on agreed discipline statements
  • Reading lists: UEA Library purchases core readings and materials on reading lists, coupled with selective purchase of supplementary items as funds permit. For disciplines where long form bibliographies (c. 75+ items) are provided instead of reading lists, academics will always be asked to identify the ‘core’ and ‘further’ readings for the module, with the remainder of the items receiving the lowest priority in terms of purchase

To achieve this, the library now runs a two-stage process. Core readings are checked first and actioned where appropriate, further reading is assigned second priority.

How long does it take the Library to check my reading list? How long does it take the Library to check my reading list?

This can vary depending on the time of year, with the Library experiencing high volumes of reading lists published for several weeks before the start of each semester.  The Library is now aiming to work towards these targets.

  • A) We will aim to check 90% of list entries flagged as core reading against existing stock, with any necessary ‘core reading’ orders placed within 10 working days or under.
  • B) We will aim to check 90% of list entries flagged as further reading against existing stock, with any necessary orders placed within 20 working days or under.

Once ordered, we will make resources available as quickly as possible.  eBooks are usually available within 7 days of ordering, but print orders can take a few weeks to become available – especially if they are out of print or difficult to source.

How long does it take the Library to scan in a digitisation request? How long does it take the Library to scan in a digitisation request?

While we aim to fulfil digitisation requests as quickly as possible, please allow up to two weeks for a digitisation request to be fulfilled.