The Advising System - Purpose, Scope, Training and Roles The Advising System - Purpose, Scope, Training and Roles

The Advising System

The Purpose of the Advising System

The Scope of the Advising System

The role of the Adviser – Meeting your advisees

The role of the Adviser – Joint Honours students

The role of the Adviser – Supporting your advisees

Adviser Training

Systems and record keeping to support Advising

The role of the Senior Adviser

The role of the Disability Liaison Officer

Information for Students  

 

The Advising System

This section provides information and resources for academic members of staff who act as personal advisers to undergraduate and postgraduate students studying on taught courses.

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The Purpose of the Advising System

UEA has an excellent reputation for the student experience, and our students report high levels of satisfaction with the academic and pastoral support they receive from staff. Central to the University’s approach to student support is the Advising System. The UEA Advising System aims to support students in achieving their academic and personal development and prepare students for graduate employment or further study by offering academic, professional and personal advice, guidance and support

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The Scope of the Advising System

The Advising System is available to all taught students, including visiting and part-time students. Each student will be allocated an Adviser at the start of their studies and each school has a Senior Adviser whose role it is to oversee the operation of the Advising System in their School. (Senior Advisers are supported by a Deputy Senior Adviser and a Disability Liaison Officer). The principal mechanism of advising students on campus is face-to-face meetings with their individual academic Adviser. For students studying away from the University, on distance-learning courses, placements, study abroad or in industry, the nature of the support may be different, and alternative methods of communications including Skype, email and telephone will be offered.

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The role of the Adviser – Meeting your advisees

Advisers will arrange to see their new advisees as part of their induction onto their new course, and regularly throughout their studies.

Advisers will invite their advisees to at least three meetings each year, in addition to the initial meeting at the start of their course; in some Schools (particularly, but not exclusively, professional Schools) this may be more.

Advisers are expected to strongly encourage students to attend these meetings, so that a supportive and effective relationship can develop. Meetings specifically convened to discuss attendance and engagement are not optional.

Advisers will ensure that they offer opportunities for students to discuss any concerns at other times. Advisers are expected to respond within 48 hours to such requests so advisees can be given timely advice, reassurance or further referral as required.

Advisers should ensure that their advisees know how to contact them and to whom to go to when they are unavailable, including out of semester time.

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The role of the Adviser – Advisers of students studying on a joint honours course between two Schools

Advisers of students studying a joint honours course delivered by two Schools should ensure they keep in regular contact with their advisee’s link person in the other School, including joint meeting(s) with the student if appropriate, to ensure such students are well supported and advised. (The link person from the joint School, often the deputy Course Director for the course, can be added a secondary Adviser for each student, which will enable them to access their student details on eVision).

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The role of the Adviser - Academic, professional and personal advice, guidance and support

A good Adviser listens, avoids making judgements, is proactive when difficulties become apparent, and is fully aware of UEA regulations and sources of further advice and guidance.

Advisers will provide ongoing support to advisees. They are expected to discuss academic progress, personal and skills development and general wellbeing at the meetings, and an ‘Advising Meeting Framework’ to help them with this is available in the resources section. Schools may add to or adapt these topics, as appropriate for particular disciplines.

It is expected that Advisers will be able to assist their advisees in interpreting and reflecting upon feedback on their assessments, especially in a holistic way across modules. Helping support students in their studies is a key component of the Advising System. Where the Adviser does not have sufficient detailed technical expertise, they may facilitate a meeting with another relevant academic.

Advisers are required to offer and advising session to any of their advisees referred to reassessment. Details are available at: Supporting students undertaking reassessment

Advisers are expected to meet with any advisee where the School has concerns about the student’s attendance and engagement, as part of the Attendance, Progress and Engagement Regulation.

Advisers are expected to write references for those advisees who have regularly attended Advising Meetings. An Adviser who has rarely seen a student should inform that student that they are unlikely to be able to write an effective reference.

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Adviser training

Advisers should ensure that they are fully briefed on the requirements of the role, have undergone appropriate training at the required frequencies, and are able to refer advisees to the other specialist support services as required. It is the responsibility of the University to offer Adviser training opportunities and of Heads of Schools, normally through their Senior Adviser, to highlight training requirement for Advisers and ensure Advisers attend at the required frequencies (at least once every three years).

*****Click here to join our online training course (UEA employees only)*******

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Systems and record-keeping to support Advising

Advisers have access to their advisees’ student record information, and will be expected to record meeting attendance to monitor the operation of the Advising System.

Advisers are expected to make brief notes on the student record system of the main points covered in meetings and any action points to inform future discussions with their advisee. This is a requirement for students holding a Tier 4 Visa, as part of the process to monitor their engagement with their studies. These records will be available to the advisee, the Adviser and the Senior and Deputy Senior Adviser in the School. The fact that a personal issue is affecting the student should be recorded, along with the agreed follow-up actions, but details of a personal or sensitive nature should only be recorded on the system with the student's consent.

Advisers will respect student confidentiality and be aware of when it is and when it is not appropriate to share information with others. Advice on the latter can be found in the Student Support Service’ Supporting vulnerable students guidance publication and from Student Support Service staff.

There is also a helpsheet on how to create meetings and record notes on eVision.

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The Role of the Senior Adviser

Every Head of School will appoint a Senior Adviser and a Deputy Senior Adviser to manage the Advising System within their School. The Senior Adviser allocates advisees to Advisers, working with their Learning and Teaching Service Hub, reviewing allocations each year being mindful of study leave and other academic commitments. Senior Advisers should review the number of advisees each Adviser has annually, so that the load is manageable alongside the Adviser’s other academic commitments. Students tend to like to have the same Adviser each year, so if a change is necessary, due to non-availability of the original Adviser, or an uneven load, the Senior Adviser must ensure that the students are informed of the change in a pro-active manner, and that arrangements are put in place for the students to meet their new Adviser. Senior Advisers will also support students who wish to change their Adviser.

Senior Advisers will ensure that students know about the Advising System through induction presentations, handbooks and/or initial advising meetings and they know who their Adviser is.

Senior Advisers will ensure that all the Advisers in their School are up to date with the training requirements and are briefed on any School-specific aspects of their advising role. They will keep abreast of up to date information on advising and sources of additional information and support, disseminating to Advisers appropriately.

Senior Advisers can expect to pick up some more complex referrals from Advisers, and they should be available for advisees if they are having problems with their Advisers or cannot get hold of them.

Senior Advisers are expected to act as Adviser to any students who are under 18, or allocate such students to another Adviser in the School who has had a Disclosure and Barring Service check.

Senior Advisers will report annually on the effectiveness of the Advising System in their School to the School’s Staff Student Liaison Committee, the School Board and the Faculty Learning and Teaching Committee. To this end, they will attend the School’s Staff Student Liaison Committee and they may chair the Committee.

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The Role of the Disability Liaison Officer

The Head of School will appoint a Disability Liaison Officer (DLO) for their School. For some Schools, the Senior Adviser or Deputy Senior Adviser takes on this responsibility. Where it is a separate person, the Senior Adviser and Disability Liaison Officer work closely together.

The DLO will act as a referral and information point for all other members of staff and students in the School about disability issues and support.

The DLO will liaise with the Disability Co-ordinator in the Student Support Service’ Office concerning University policy, procedure and strategy and other matters related to provision of effective support for students with disabilities, including specific learning difficulties, or with mental health difficulties with respect to the learning and teaching environment.

The DLO will promote and disseminate central staff development initiatives in relation to the impact of disability issues on a student’s academic performance and the adjustments that can be made to minimise the impact of their difficulties. He or she will have broad knowledge of disability legislation and the University’s response, and be able to inform other staff of current initiatives and requirements. The DLO will attend staff development courses in the area of disability to ensure up to date familiarisation with current developments.

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Information for Students

Information for students on the University Advising System is available here.

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