Encouraging staff to become a school governor Encouraging staff to become a school governor

As part of UEA’s Access Agreement with the Office for Students and work undertaken with the Recruitment and Outreach department, the University is keen to support local schools and encourage members of staff to consider becoming a school governor.

The University’s Outreach department can help UEA staff to find volunteering placements as governors in local schools (please find below list of current vacancies). 

To support school governors who work at UEA, the UEA Governors Network has recently been established to meet up to three times a year to share best practice, ideas and engage in relevant training which we hope will be useful to your role as a school governor. The online platform GovernorHub is used to facilitate the Network.

Becoming a school governor is a voluntary role and a very rewarding opportunity for continued personal development as you may have the opportunity to be involved in a wide range of issues running a school from raising academic attainment to student recruitment. 

Training will be provided by local schools and/or academies. You are not required to be a parent or have a prior relationship with a school to be able to be a governor.

As part of your role as a governor, there may be times that you will be required to be out of the office for governor duties in-school during office hours.

Before applying for a governor position, please seek guidance from your manager about the usual commitments of a governor. Guidance from Human Resources on the time that staff can take out of the office for governor duties will be published shortly, please do speak to us if you have any queries in the meantime.

What's it like to be a school governor? What's it like to be a school governor?

Stefanie Copsey, UEA Outreach Manager is a governor at City Academy Norwich (CAN).

Why did you chose that school and want to become a governor?

UEA has always had close links with CAN through the UEA outreach team. As a civic university, we have a responsibility to our local schools and young people to ensure they’re getting the best education and opportunities in life. I also felt like being a governor at a school on our doorstep would give me an invaluable insight into our local young people and the challenges they face. They’ve recently changed academy trust so it seemed like the right time to join. 

How did you become a governor?

The school made it very easy for me. I attended part of a governors meeting as a guest and followed this up with a chat with the head. Once I was sure of the time commitment and level of responsibility I completed an application form that was very similar to a standard job application. 

What do you do as a school governor and how do you manage to fit this commitment around your busy schedule?

There was initially a large of amount of time spent reading the relevant policy documents. Governor meetings are two hours every two months so not a huge amount of time out of my diary. I also have the occasional exclusion panel but the school are very good at giving plenty of notice to ensure I can factor this into my working week. My favourite part of being a governor has been getting to understand the inner workings of a school in much more detail. It’s been fascinating to see the time and effort that goes into learning and teaching by getting to know the teachers at the school.

Current vacancies Current vacancies

Please find below list of current school governor vacancies. For further information and how to apply, please email governors@uea.ac.uk 

Schools
•    Ashleigh Primary School (Wymondham) - keen to have UEA student as school governor
•    Attleborough Primary School
•    Beck Row Primary Academy (Beck Row, Suffolk)
•    Benjamin Britten School (Lowestoft)
•    Blenheim Park Academy (Scupthorpe near Fakenham)
•    Caister Academy (Great Yarmouth)
•    City Academy Norwich (Norwich)
•    Cliff Park Ormiston Academy (Great Yarmouth)
•    College of West Anglia (King's Lynn)
•    Colman Infant (Norwich)
•    Diocese of Norwich Priority Academies and Schools (more are available):
Kingfisher Partnership (comprises two academies in Ditchingham and Gillingham St Michael near Beccles/Bungay)
Nar Valley Federation (comprises three academies in Easton, Hockering and Great Witchingham)
Open Academy (Heartsease, Norwich)
Rudham & Weasenham Federation (comprises two academies in East Rudham and Weasenham) 
The Bishop’s Church of England Primary Academy (Thetford)
Thomas Bullock Church of England Primary Academy (Shipdham near Thetford)
•    Edward Worlledge Ormiston Academy (Great Yarmouth)
•    Great Heath Primary Academy (Mildenhall, Suffolk)
•    Happisburgh Primary School
•    Hethersett VC Junior School (Norwich)
•    Iceni Academy (Thetford)
•    KWEST Multi Academy Trust (King's Lynn and surrounding district) are looking for people to join the board of trustees
•    Marshland High School (Wisbech)
•    Ormiston Cliff Park Infants and Junior Academies (joint governing board for both schools) (Great Yarmouth)
•    Ormiston Herman Academy (Great Yarmouth)
•    Queen's Hill Primary School (Norwich)
•    Robert Kett Primary School (Wymondham)
•    Sewell Park Academy (Norwich)
•    The Fen Rivers Academy (King's Lynn)
•    The Nebula Federation Governing Board (all six schools including: Frettenham Primary School, Hainford Church of England Primary School, Horsford Church of England VA Primary School, Old Catton Church of England Junior School, St Faiths' Church of England Primary School and White Woman Lane Junior School)
•    Watlington Primary School (near King's Lynn)
•    Wayland Junior Academy (Watton)